ACSA member shares first-hand experiences: Student protests Part 2

February 27, 2018 ACSA Writer

ACSA is teaming up with education advocates and thought leaders to provide you with first-hand expertise on student protests and walkouts.

Los Alamitos Unified School District superintendent Dr. Sherry Kropp has first-hand knowledge with student protests and walkouts. As part of a series profiling best practices for these situations, Kropp offers the following tips for statewide administrators:

  • Ensuring the safety of students is priority number one. When it comes to student actions or protests, we work to keep the students on campus.
  • We don’t encourage walking off the school campus. We provide extra supervisors in an effort to keep students on campus to protect their safety.
  • If students do leave campus for an action or protest, we make sure law enforcement agencies are involved in a supportive manner.
  • Law enforcement is used as a safety measure, not a practice to bring the students back to campus. We ask law enforcement to not intervene but provide a presence.
  • We want to leverage student actions and protests as a learning opportunity. If students want to participate in an action or protest, we want it to be more substantive then holding a sign.
  • We give our students several options for engagement, including opportunities to write about their feels, reach out to lawmakers, register students to vote, as well as provide a forum to talk about issues.
  • We want our students to understand that different people have different opinions and they need to be respectful of that.
  • We encourage our teachers to not be involved in the student actions or protests. We do know that if kids walk out, teachers have a tendency to go with them.
  • Beyond student actions or protests, districts must provide professional development to teachers and staffs. Employees must learn the district policies and procedures and know what they can and should do to support students.
  • Ensuring the safety of students is priority number one. When it comes to student actions or protests, we work to keep the students on campus.
  • We don’t encourage walking off the school campus. We provide extra supervisors in an effort to keep students on campus to protect their safety.
  • If students do leave campus for an action or protest, we make sure law enforcement agencies are involved in a supportive manner.
  • Law enforcement is used as a safety measure, not a practice to bring the students back to campus. We ask law enforcement to not intervene but provide a presence.
  • We want to leverage student actions and protests as a learning opportunity. If students want to participate in an action or protest, we want it to be more substantive then holding a sign.
  • We give our students several options for engagement, including opportunities to write about their feels, reach out to lawmakers, register students to vote, as well as provide a forum to talk about issues.
  • We want our students to understand that different people have different opinions and they need to be respectful of that.
  • We encourage our teachers to not be involved in the student actions or protests. We do know that if kids walk out, teachers have a tendency to go with them.
  • Beyond student actions or protests, districts must provide professional development to teachers and staffs. Employees must learn the district policies and procedures and know what they can and should do to support students.

ACSA is dedicated to providing K-12 administrators with relevant content and building events that focus on today’s most important school administration issues. Become a member and join us for our world-class Leadership Summit, Every Child Counts Symposium, and other conferences, as well as professional development events, a free one-on-one mentorship program, our ongoing Equity Project and statewide advocacy efforts, members-only benefits, and much more.

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Walkout FAQs from F3: Students' call to action to make their voices heard
Walkout FAQs from F3: Students' call to action to make their voices heard

Questions and answers from Fagen Friedman & Fulfrost (F3 Law).

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Guidelines and suggestions from AALRR to help prepare for and respond to student protests
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Implications of employee speech, implications of employee speech, and creative approaches to student walkouts.

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