School Violence

UCLA - School shooting raises concerns about enhancing school capacity to provide mental health assistance

The Association of California School Administrators is the largest umbrella organization for school leaders in the United States, serving more than 17,000 California educators.

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2 S ome Resource Updates From the Field >About School Shootings – http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/pdfdocs/shooting.pdf >Evidence based policy making – http://forumfyi.org/evidence-based-policymaking >Model to inform culturally responsive practices – https://www.wisconsinrticenter.org/assets/files/resources/Model%20to%20Inform%20Cul turally%20Responsive%20Practices.pdf >Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act: Federal Agencies' Collaboration Generally Reflected Leading Practices, but Could Be Enhanced – https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-171 >Can there be too much emphasis on gathering more data? – http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/pdfdocs/assessitis.pdf ################################# T opical Exchange: >School shooting raises concerns about enhancing school capacity to provide mental health assistance As with other problems confronting schools, violence using guns is a major societal (and political) problem. Schools can't solve the problem alone, but they must play a significant role in addressing the problem and its impact. Here's what that means. (1) Prevention (A) Going Beyond Security Measures. Schools must implement prevention efforts that go beyond enhancing security. In particular, they must do more to promote positive social and emotional development and address threats to such development. There is a movement for a great focu on social and emotional learning. But too little attention is being paid to reducing factors that undermine positive mental health. Schools need to examine the way vulnerable students are inappropriately treated each day at school in classrooms and school-wide by staff and peers. And then they must act to turn the situation around. (B) Providing Special Supports as Soon as a Problem Appears. Schools have a range of student and learning supports. However, these supports are not well designed and developed to respond quickly and effectively in situations where there are many students who teachers readily identify as beginning to manifest behavior, learning, and emotional problems. (C) Ensuring that Students with Severe and Chronic Problems are Connected with Effective Help. Few schools can provide intensive help, so they need to develop strong connections with community resources to facilitate appropriate referrals and follow-through. (2) Aftermath Interventions for Students and Staff in all schools. See the following resources: >Talking to kids about tragedies (such as shootings and terror attacks) in the news https://www.schoolcrisiscenter.org/resources/talking-kids-about-tragedies/ >Talking to kids about school shootings (from the American Psychology Assoc.) http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/qf/crisis_qt/APAshooting.pdf

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