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Which instructional practices can be used by both special education and general education teachers to improve academic achievement among students with disabilities?

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Center on Education Policy, Equity and Governance THE QUESTION Which instructional practices can be used by both special education and general education teachers to improve academic achievement among students with disabilities? : : Douglas Fuchs and Lynn S. Fuchs, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University Schools across the nation are searching for a best way of educating together students with and without disabilities. One popular approach is Response to Instruction (RTI), a way to deliver inclusive and effective education to virtually all children. RTI's most noteworthy feature is its multiple tiers of increasingly intensive instruction. However, in practice, schools have had trouble correctly implementing how students are moved along between tiers. A promising means of addressing this problem and improving the effectiveness of RTI is known as Peer- Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS), a suite of programs in reading and mathematics that were validated as supplements in the general classroom.

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